Game of Thrones season one episode four Game of Thrones season one episode four Game of Thrones season one episode four Game of Thrones season one episode four Game of Thrones season one episode four Game of Thrones season one episode four Game of Thrones season one episode four Game of Thrones season one episode four Game of Thrones season one episode four Game of Thrones season one episode four

Game of Thrones season one episode four

cinephilearchive:

Garrett Brown, the inventor of the Steadicam, talks about the nuts and bolts of The Shining's production, with plenty of behind-the-scenes insight into the Kubrick filmmaking process. “His discussions of Kubrick as a filmmaker who approached film from an almost scientific point of view are interesting and readily apparent when watching the film. A perfect example of how a commentary can really enhance your appreciation of a film.”

“I guess I wanted to be there myself because Kubrick is, let’s face it, The Man. He is the one director working who commands absolute authority over his project from conception to release print. The ultimate technologist, but more, his technology serves a larger vision which is uniquely his own. He is a filmmaker in the most pure sense of the word. I learned a great deal about the making of movies from simply being on hand for the stupefying number of discussions which sought to improve one aspect or another of the production.” —Garrett Brown

Two articles from the August 1980 issue of American Cinematographer, detailing the making of Stanley Kubrick’s horror masterpiece. The first article consists of an interview with cinematographer John Alcott, while the second article — The Steadicam and The Shining — looks in detail at the Steadicam, Garrett Brown’s then-brand-new stabilization rig.



In this great short documentary, Garrett Brown taks about ‘Rocky’ (and the famous ‘stairs’ shot), ‘Bound For Glory,’ and of course his revolutionary invention — the Steadicam. A must see for anyone whose passion is cinematography.

There is also an incredible interview with Garrett Brown on his experience on Brian De Palma’s masterpiece ‘Blow Out.’

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

// 
cinephilearchive:

Garrett Brown, the inventor of the Steadicam, talks about the nuts and bolts of The Shining's production, with plenty of behind-the-scenes insight into the Kubrick filmmaking process. “His discussions of Kubrick as a filmmaker who approached film from an almost scientific point of view are interesting and readily apparent when watching the film. A perfect example of how a commentary can really enhance your appreciation of a film.”

“I guess I wanted to be there myself because Kubrick is, let’s face it, The Man. He is the one director working who commands absolute authority over his project from conception to release print. The ultimate technologist, but more, his technology serves a larger vision which is uniquely his own. He is a filmmaker in the most pure sense of the word. I learned a great deal about the making of movies from simply being on hand for the stupefying number of discussions which sought to improve one aspect or another of the production.” —Garrett Brown

Two articles from the August 1980 issue of American Cinematographer, detailing the making of Stanley Kubrick’s horror masterpiece. The first article consists of an interview with cinematographer John Alcott, while the second article — The Steadicam and The Shining — looks in detail at the Steadicam, Garrett Brown’s then-brand-new stabilization rig.



In this great short documentary, Garrett Brown taks about ‘Rocky’ (and the famous ‘stairs’ shot), ‘Bound For Glory,’ and of course his revolutionary invention — the Steadicam. A must see for anyone whose passion is cinematography.

There is also an incredible interview with Garrett Brown on his experience on Brian De Palma’s masterpiece ‘Blow Out.’

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

// 
cinephilearchive:

Garrett Brown, the inventor of the Steadicam, talks about the nuts and bolts of The Shining's production, with plenty of behind-the-scenes insight into the Kubrick filmmaking process. “His discussions of Kubrick as a filmmaker who approached film from an almost scientific point of view are interesting and readily apparent when watching the film. A perfect example of how a commentary can really enhance your appreciation of a film.”

“I guess I wanted to be there myself because Kubrick is, let’s face it, The Man. He is the one director working who commands absolute authority over his project from conception to release print. The ultimate technologist, but more, his technology serves a larger vision which is uniquely his own. He is a filmmaker in the most pure sense of the word. I learned a great deal about the making of movies from simply being on hand for the stupefying number of discussions which sought to improve one aspect or another of the production.” —Garrett Brown

Two articles from the August 1980 issue of American Cinematographer, detailing the making of Stanley Kubrick’s horror masterpiece. The first article consists of an interview with cinematographer John Alcott, while the second article — The Steadicam and The Shining — looks in detail at the Steadicam, Garrett Brown’s then-brand-new stabilization rig.



In this great short documentary, Garrett Brown taks about ‘Rocky’ (and the famous ‘stairs’ shot), ‘Bound For Glory,’ and of course his revolutionary invention — the Steadicam. A must see for anyone whose passion is cinematography.

There is also an incredible interview with Garrett Brown on his experience on Brian De Palma’s masterpiece ‘Blow Out.’

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

// 
cinephilearchive:

Garrett Brown, the inventor of the Steadicam, talks about the nuts and bolts of The Shining's production, with plenty of behind-the-scenes insight into the Kubrick filmmaking process. “His discussions of Kubrick as a filmmaker who approached film from an almost scientific point of view are interesting and readily apparent when watching the film. A perfect example of how a commentary can really enhance your appreciation of a film.”

“I guess I wanted to be there myself because Kubrick is, let’s face it, The Man. He is the one director working who commands absolute authority over his project from conception to release print. The ultimate technologist, but more, his technology serves a larger vision which is uniquely his own. He is a filmmaker in the most pure sense of the word. I learned a great deal about the making of movies from simply being on hand for the stupefying number of discussions which sought to improve one aspect or another of the production.” —Garrett Brown

Two articles from the August 1980 issue of American Cinematographer, detailing the making of Stanley Kubrick’s horror masterpiece. The first article consists of an interview with cinematographer John Alcott, while the second article — The Steadicam and The Shining — looks in detail at the Steadicam, Garrett Brown’s then-brand-new stabilization rig.



In this great short documentary, Garrett Brown taks about ‘Rocky’ (and the famous ‘stairs’ shot), ‘Bound For Glory,’ and of course his revolutionary invention — the Steadicam. A must see for anyone whose passion is cinematography.

There is also an incredible interview with Garrett Brown on his experience on Brian De Palma’s masterpiece ‘Blow Out.’

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

// 
cinephilearchive:

Garrett Brown, the inventor of the Steadicam, talks about the nuts and bolts of The Shining's production, with plenty of behind-the-scenes insight into the Kubrick filmmaking process. “His discussions of Kubrick as a filmmaker who approached film from an almost scientific point of view are interesting and readily apparent when watching the film. A perfect example of how a commentary can really enhance your appreciation of a film.”

“I guess I wanted to be there myself because Kubrick is, let’s face it, The Man. He is the one director working who commands absolute authority over his project from conception to release print. The ultimate technologist, but more, his technology serves a larger vision which is uniquely his own. He is a filmmaker in the most pure sense of the word. I learned a great deal about the making of movies from simply being on hand for the stupefying number of discussions which sought to improve one aspect or another of the production.” —Garrett Brown

Two articles from the August 1980 issue of American Cinematographer, detailing the making of Stanley Kubrick’s horror masterpiece. The first article consists of an interview with cinematographer John Alcott, while the second article — The Steadicam and The Shining — looks in detail at the Steadicam, Garrett Brown’s then-brand-new stabilization rig.



In this great short documentary, Garrett Brown taks about ‘Rocky’ (and the famous ‘stairs’ shot), ‘Bound For Glory,’ and of course his revolutionary invention — the Steadicam. A must see for anyone whose passion is cinematography.

There is also an incredible interview with Garrett Brown on his experience on Brian De Palma’s masterpiece ‘Blow Out.’

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

// 
cinephilearchive:

Garrett Brown, the inventor of the Steadicam, talks about the nuts and bolts of The Shining's production, with plenty of behind-the-scenes insight into the Kubrick filmmaking process. “His discussions of Kubrick as a filmmaker who approached film from an almost scientific point of view are interesting and readily apparent when watching the film. A perfect example of how a commentary can really enhance your appreciation of a film.”

“I guess I wanted to be there myself because Kubrick is, let’s face it, The Man. He is the one director working who commands absolute authority over his project from conception to release print. The ultimate technologist, but more, his technology serves a larger vision which is uniquely his own. He is a filmmaker in the most pure sense of the word. I learned a great deal about the making of movies from simply being on hand for the stupefying number of discussions which sought to improve one aspect or another of the production.” —Garrett Brown

Two articles from the August 1980 issue of American Cinematographer, detailing the making of Stanley Kubrick’s horror masterpiece. The first article consists of an interview with cinematographer John Alcott, while the second article — The Steadicam and The Shining — looks in detail at the Steadicam, Garrett Brown’s then-brand-new stabilization rig.



In this great short documentary, Garrett Brown taks about ‘Rocky’ (and the famous ‘stairs’ shot), ‘Bound For Glory,’ and of course his revolutionary invention — the Steadicam. A must see for anyone whose passion is cinematography.

There is also an incredible interview with Garrett Brown on his experience on Brian De Palma’s masterpiece ‘Blow Out.’

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

//

cinephilearchive:

Garrett Brown, the inventor of the Steadicam, talks about the nuts and bolts of The Shining's production, with plenty of behind-the-scenes insight into the Kubrick filmmaking process. “His discussions of Kubrick as a filmmaker who approached film from an almost scientific point of view are interesting and readily apparent when watching the film. A perfect example of how a commentary can really enhance your appreciation of a film.”

“I guess I wanted to be there myself because Kubrick is, let’s face it, The Man. He is the one director working who commands absolute authority over his project from conception to release print. The ultimate technologist, but more, his technology serves a larger vision which is uniquely his own. He is a filmmaker in the most pure sense of the word. I learned a great deal about the making of movies from simply being on hand for the stupefying number of discussions which sought to improve one aspect or another of the production.” —Garrett Brown

Two articles from the August 1980 issue of American Cinematographer, detailing the making of Stanley Kubrick’s horror masterpiece. The first article consists of an interview with cinematographer John Alcott, while the second article — The Steadicam and The Shining — looks in detail at the Steadicam, Garrett Brown’s then-brand-new stabilization rig.

In this great short documentary, Garrett Brown taks about ‘Rocky’ (and the famous ‘stairs’ shot), ‘Bound For Glory,’ and of course his revolutionary invention — the Steadicam. A must see for anyone whose passion is cinematography.

There is also an incredible interview with Garrett Brown on his experience on Brian De Palma’s masterpiece ‘Blow Out.’

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

(via joekeatinge)

Gorgeous GIFs Gorgeous GIFs Gorgeous GIFs Gorgeous GIFs Gorgeous GIFs Gorgeous GIFs Gorgeous GIFs
Game of Thrones season one episode three Game of Thrones season one episode three Game of Thrones season one episode three Game of Thrones season one episode three Game of Thrones season one episode three Game of Thrones season one episode three Game of Thrones season one episode three Game of Thrones season one episode three Game of Thrones season one episode three Game of Thrones season one episode three

Game of Thrones season one episode three

nevver:

Présents et absents, John Batho
nevver:

Présents et absents, John Batho
nevver:

Présents et absents, John Batho
Game of Thrones season one episode two Game of Thrones season one episode two Game of Thrones season one episode two Game of Thrones season one episode two Game of Thrones season one episode two Game of Thrones season one episode two Game of Thrones season one episode two Game of Thrones season one episode two Game of Thrones season one episode two Game of Thrones season one episode two

Game of Thrones season one episode two

Game of Thrones season one episode one

Now starting… Game of Thrones season one episode one

Now starting… Game of Thrones season one episode one

Now starting… Game of Thrones season one episode one

Now starting… Game of Thrones season one episode one

Now starting… Game of Thrones season one episode one

Now starting… Game of Thrones season one episode one

Now starting… Game of Thrones season one episode one

Now starting… Game of Thrones season one episode one

Now starting… Game of Thrones season one episode one

Now starting…

Game of Thrones season one episode one

Now starting…

Some Hannibal inspired photos I took Some Hannibal inspired photos I took

Some Hannibal inspired photos I took

pizza-party:

scalesofperception:

Colosses | Fabrice Fouillet | Via
Statues are often idealized works of art. They are ideological, political or religious representations and attempt to turn their subjects into fascinating, eternal figures. Even when erected to keep alive the memory of a single person, a statue that lasts many generations will eventually establish itself as a symbol for the community. 
Statues are even more influential when they are monumental. An edifice can be said to be monumental when it is unusual, extraordinary and physically imposing. It has to be abnormal — as exceptional as the political or religious power itself — and also inseparable from its symbolic aspects.
The series “Colosses” is a study of the landscapes that embrace monumental commemorative statues. 
SoP | Scale of Environments

Every time I’ve ever seen an artist’s interpretation of what the Colossus of Rhodes looked like, I’ve always wondered what it would have really looked like. That is why this is awesome to me..
pizza-party:

scalesofperception:

Colosses | Fabrice Fouillet | Via
Statues are often idealized works of art. They are ideological, political or religious representations and attempt to turn their subjects into fascinating, eternal figures. Even when erected to keep alive the memory of a single person, a statue that lasts many generations will eventually establish itself as a symbol for the community. 
Statues are even more influential when they are monumental. An edifice can be said to be monumental when it is unusual, extraordinary and physically imposing. It has to be abnormal — as exceptional as the political or religious power itself — and also inseparable from its symbolic aspects.
The series “Colosses” is a study of the landscapes that embrace monumental commemorative statues. 
SoP | Scale of Environments

Every time I’ve ever seen an artist’s interpretation of what the Colossus of Rhodes looked like, I’ve always wondered what it would have really looked like. That is why this is awesome to me..
pizza-party:

scalesofperception:

Colosses | Fabrice Fouillet | Via
Statues are often idealized works of art. They are ideological, political or religious representations and attempt to turn their subjects into fascinating, eternal figures. Even when erected to keep alive the memory of a single person, a statue that lasts many generations will eventually establish itself as a symbol for the community. 
Statues are even more influential when they are monumental. An edifice can be said to be monumental when it is unusual, extraordinary and physically imposing. It has to be abnormal — as exceptional as the political or religious power itself — and also inseparable from its symbolic aspects.
The series “Colosses” is a study of the landscapes that embrace monumental commemorative statues. 
SoP | Scale of Environments

Every time I’ve ever seen an artist’s interpretation of what the Colossus of Rhodes looked like, I’ve always wondered what it would have really looked like. That is why this is awesome to me..
pizza-party:

scalesofperception:

Colosses | Fabrice Fouillet | Via
Statues are often idealized works of art. They are ideological, political or religious representations and attempt to turn their subjects into fascinating, eternal figures. Even when erected to keep alive the memory of a single person, a statue that lasts many generations will eventually establish itself as a symbol for the community. 
Statues are even more influential when they are monumental. An edifice can be said to be monumental when it is unusual, extraordinary and physically imposing. It has to be abnormal — as exceptional as the political or religious power itself — and also inseparable from its symbolic aspects.
The series “Colosses” is a study of the landscapes that embrace monumental commemorative statues. 
SoP | Scale of Environments

Every time I’ve ever seen an artist’s interpretation of what the Colossus of Rhodes looked like, I’ve always wondered what it would have really looked like. That is why this is awesome to me..
pizza-party:

scalesofperception:

Colosses | Fabrice Fouillet | Via
Statues are often idealized works of art. They are ideological, political or religious representations and attempt to turn their subjects into fascinating, eternal figures. Even when erected to keep alive the memory of a single person, a statue that lasts many generations will eventually establish itself as a symbol for the community. 
Statues are even more influential when they are monumental. An edifice can be said to be monumental when it is unusual, extraordinary and physically imposing. It has to be abnormal — as exceptional as the political or religious power itself — and also inseparable from its symbolic aspects.
The series “Colosses” is a study of the landscapes that embrace monumental commemorative statues. 
SoP | Scale of Environments

Every time I’ve ever seen an artist’s interpretation of what the Colossus of Rhodes looked like, I’ve always wondered what it would have really looked like. That is why this is awesome to me..
pizza-party:

scalesofperception:

Colosses | Fabrice Fouillet | Via
Statues are often idealized works of art. They are ideological, political or religious representations and attempt to turn their subjects into fascinating, eternal figures. Even when erected to keep alive the memory of a single person, a statue that lasts many generations will eventually establish itself as a symbol for the community. 
Statues are even more influential when they are monumental. An edifice can be said to be monumental when it is unusual, extraordinary and physically imposing. It has to be abnormal — as exceptional as the political or religious power itself — and also inseparable from its symbolic aspects.
The series “Colosses” is a study of the landscapes that embrace monumental commemorative statues. 
SoP | Scale of Environments

Every time I’ve ever seen an artist’s interpretation of what the Colossus of Rhodes looked like, I’ve always wondered what it would have really looked like. That is why this is awesome to me..
pizza-party:

scalesofperception:

Colosses | Fabrice Fouillet | Via
Statues are often idealized works of art. They are ideological, political or religious representations and attempt to turn their subjects into fascinating, eternal figures. Even when erected to keep alive the memory of a single person, a statue that lasts many generations will eventually establish itself as a symbol for the community. 
Statues are even more influential when they are monumental. An edifice can be said to be monumental when it is unusual, extraordinary and physically imposing. It has to be abnormal — as exceptional as the political or religious power itself — and also inseparable from its symbolic aspects.
The series “Colosses” is a study of the landscapes that embrace monumental commemorative statues. 
SoP | Scale of Environments

Every time I’ve ever seen an artist’s interpretation of what the Colossus of Rhodes looked like, I’ve always wondered what it would have really looked like. That is why this is awesome to me..
pizza-party:

scalesofperception:

Colosses | Fabrice Fouillet | Via
Statues are often idealized works of art. They are ideological, political or religious representations and attempt to turn their subjects into fascinating, eternal figures. Even when erected to keep alive the memory of a single person, a statue that lasts many generations will eventually establish itself as a symbol for the community. 
Statues are even more influential when they are monumental. An edifice can be said to be monumental when it is unusual, extraordinary and physically imposing. It has to be abnormal — as exceptional as the political or religious power itself — and also inseparable from its symbolic aspects.
The series “Colosses” is a study of the landscapes that embrace monumental commemorative statues. 
SoP | Scale of Environments

Every time I’ve ever seen an artist’s interpretation of what the Colossus of Rhodes looked like, I’ve always wondered what it would have really looked like. That is why this is awesome to me..
pizza-party:

scalesofperception:

Colosses | Fabrice Fouillet | Via
Statues are often idealized works of art. They are ideological, political or religious representations and attempt to turn their subjects into fascinating, eternal figures. Even when erected to keep alive the memory of a single person, a statue that lasts many generations will eventually establish itself as a symbol for the community. 
Statues are even more influential when they are monumental. An edifice can be said to be monumental when it is unusual, extraordinary and physically imposing. It has to be abnormal — as exceptional as the political or religious power itself — and also inseparable from its symbolic aspects.
The series “Colosses” is a study of the landscapes that embrace monumental commemorative statues. 
SoP | Scale of Environments

Every time I’ve ever seen an artist’s interpretation of what the Colossus of Rhodes looked like, I’ve always wondered what it would have really looked like. That is why this is awesome to me..
pizza-party:

scalesofperception:

Colosses | Fabrice Fouillet | Via
Statues are often idealized works of art. They are ideological, political or religious representations and attempt to turn their subjects into fascinating, eternal figures. Even when erected to keep alive the memory of a single person, a statue that lasts many generations will eventually establish itself as a symbol for the community. 
Statues are even more influential when they are monumental. An edifice can be said to be monumental when it is unusual, extraordinary and physically imposing. It has to be abnormal — as exceptional as the political or religious power itself — and also inseparable from its symbolic aspects.
The series “Colosses” is a study of the landscapes that embrace monumental commemorative statues. 
SoP | Scale of Environments

Every time I’ve ever seen an artist’s interpretation of what the Colossus of Rhodes looked like, I’ve always wondered what it would have really looked like. That is why this is awesome to me..

pizza-party:

scalesofperception:

Colosses | Fabrice Fouillet | Via

Statues are often idealized works of art. They are ideological, political or religious representations and attempt to turn their subjects into fascinating, eternal figures. Even when erected to keep alive the memory of a single person, a statue that lasts many generations will eventually establish itself as a symbol for the community. 

Statues are even more influential when they are monumental. An edifice can be said to be monumental when it is unusual, extraordinary and physically imposing. It has to be abnormal — as exceptional as the political or religious power itself — and also inseparable from its symbolic aspects.

The series “Colosses” is a study of the landscapes that embrace monumental commemorative statues. 

SoP | Scale of Environments

Every time I’ve ever seen an artist’s interpretation of what the Colossus of Rhodes looked like, I’ve always wondered what it would have really looked like. That is why this is awesome to me..

(via joekeatinge)

Gyo by Junji Ito

His third acts seem to deflate a bit, but his storytelling is wonderful and his comics always have a handful of absolutely chilling moments.  Gyo by Junji Ito

His third acts seem to deflate a bit, but his storytelling is wonderful and his comics always have a handful of absolutely chilling moments.  Gyo by Junji Ito

His third acts seem to deflate a bit, but his storytelling is wonderful and his comics always have a handful of absolutely chilling moments.  Gyo by Junji Ito

His third acts seem to deflate a bit, but his storytelling is wonderful and his comics always have a handful of absolutely chilling moments.  Gyo by Junji Ito

His third acts seem to deflate a bit, but his storytelling is wonderful and his comics always have a handful of absolutely chilling moments.  Gyo by Junji Ito

His third acts seem to deflate a bit, but his storytelling is wonderful and his comics always have a handful of absolutely chilling moments.  Gyo by Junji Ito

His third acts seem to deflate a bit, but his storytelling is wonderful and his comics always have a handful of absolutely chilling moments.  Gyo by Junji Ito

His third acts seem to deflate a bit, but his storytelling is wonderful and his comics always have a handful of absolutely chilling moments.  Gyo by Junji Ito

His third acts seem to deflate a bit, but his storytelling is wonderful and his comics always have a handful of absolutely chilling moments.  Gyo by Junji Ito

His third acts seem to deflate a bit, but his storytelling is wonderful and his comics always have a handful of absolutely chilling moments. 

Gyo by Junji Ito

His third acts seem to deflate a bit, but his storytelling is wonderful and his comics always have a handful of absolutely chilling moments.